Jan
18

Dance Genre Buzz – Salsa Dance

Salsa is a Latin dance form with origins from the Cuban Son (circa 1920s) and Afro-Cuban dance (specifically Afro-Cuban rumba).  It is generally associated with the salsa music style, although it may be danced under other types of Latin music.

Salsa is normally a partner dance, although there are forms such as a line dance form “Salsa suelta”, where the dancers dance individually and a round dance form “Rueda de Casino” where multiple couples exchange partners in a circle.  Salsa can be improvised or performed with a set routine.

Salsa is a popular social dance throughout Latin America as well as in North America, Europe, Australia, and some countries in Asia and the Middle East.

Origins Salsa dance movements originate from the Cuban Son dancing of the 1940s more specifically through the beat of Son Montuno with strong influences from the dance of Danzon, Mambo, Guaguanco and other Afro-Cuban folkloric dancing.

Today there are many various styles of salsa dancing because of geographical dispersion and cultural syncretism. The most well-known styles are Cali-style (from Colombia), Cuban-style (“Casino”), LA-style, New York-style, Puerto Rican-style.

Salsa is typically a partner dance, although there are recognized solo forms (Floor Shines/ Shines), line dancing (suelta), and Rueda de Casino, where groups of couples exchange partners in a circle.  Salsa can be improvised or performed with a set routine, choreography and freestyle.

View this video to see a sample of Freestyle Salsa dancing.

Styles Salsa’s roots are based on Afro-Cuban Rumba and Son dancing, and is open to improvisation and thus it is continuously evolving. New modern salsa styles are associated and named to the original geographic areas that developed them. There are often devotees of each of these styles outside of their home territory.

Characteristics that may identify a style include: timing, basic steps, foot patterns, body rolls and movements, turns and figures, attitude, dance influences and the way that partners hold each other. The point in a musical bar music where a slightly larger step is taken (the break step) and the direction the step moves can often be used to identify a style.

Incorporating other dance styling techniques into salsa dancing has become very common, for both men and women: shimmies, leg work, arm work, body movement, spins, body isolations, shoulder shimmies, rolls, even hand styling, acrobatics and lifts.

Latin American styles originate from Cuba and surrounding Caribbean islands and then expanding to Venezuela, Colombia, Nicaragua, Puerto Rico, the Dominican Republic, and the rest of the Hispanic countries; also heavily influence “Miami” style which is a fusion of Cuban style and North American version. The styles include “Casino”, Miami-Style, Cali-style and Venezuelan Style.

North American styles have different characteristics: Los Angeles style breaks on the first beat “On 1″ while New York style breaks on the second beat “On 2″. Both have different origins and evolutionary path, as the New York Salsa is heavily influenced by Jazz instruments in its early growth stage.

Colombian / Cali style

Salsa (Cali Style) Cali-Style Salsa, also known as Colombian Salsa, is based on geographical location of the Colombian City of Cali.

Cali is also known as the “Capital de la Salsa” (World’s Salsa Capital); due to salsa music being the main genre in parties, nightclubs and festivals in the 21st century.  The elements of Cali-Style Salsa were strongly influenced by dances done to Colombian rhythms such as Cumbia and Boogaloo.

The basic step of Colombian Salsa is the “Atras” or “Diagonal”; breaking backwards diagonally instead of moving forwards and backwards as seen in the New York and L.A. Style. Dancers do not shift their body weight greatly as seen in other styles. Instead, dancers keep their upper body still, poised and relaxed while the feet execute endless intricacies. The dancer breaks mostly On1 (sometimes On3), with short measures of “4” instead of full “8” counts.

A major difference of Cali Style and the other styles is the footwork which has quick rapid steps and skipping motions. They do not execute Cross-body Leads or the “Dile Que No” as seen in LA/New York-style and Cuban-style salsa, respectively. Their footwork is intricate and precise, helping several Colombian Style dancers win major world championships. Cali hosts many annual salsa events such as the World Salsa Cali Festival and Encuentro de Melomanos y Coleccionistas.

Cuban “Casino” style

Salsa dance (Cuban Style) Cuban-style salsa, also known as Casino, is popular in many places around the world, including in Europe, Latin America, North America, and even in some countries in the Middle East. Dancing Casino is an expression of popular social culture; Latin Americans consider casino as part of social and cultural activities centering around their popular music. The origins of the name Casino are derived from the Spanish term for the dance halls where a lot of social Salsa dancing was done in Cuba during the mid-20th century and onward.

Historically, Casino traces its origin as a partner dance from Cuban Son dancing, and its rhythmic body motions from Afro-Cuban Rumba heritage. Son is considered an older version and ancestor to Salsa. Son is danced on delay measure upbeat (contra-tiempo) following the 2-3 clave (Son Clave) whereas Casino is usually danced on the downbeat break of 1 or 3 (a-tiempo). Musically, the beats 1, 3, 5 and 7 are considered downbeats; whereas 2, 4, 6 and 8 are considered upbeats. Casino was popularized in the late 1950s as the Cuban Son received upbeat and quicker arrangements by musicians. Casino has a very independent development, free from external influences such as Puerto Rican and North American dances partly due to the effect of the Cuban Embargo.

Miami-style Casino

Developed by Cuban migrants to Florida and centered around Miami, this form of Cuban Salsa fused with American culture and LA Style.

Major differences of Miami-style Casino is that it is exclusive dance to downbeat (On1) and has elements of shines and showstyle added to it following repertoires of North American Styles.  Miami-style has many adherents, particularly Cuban-Americans and other Latinos based in South Florida.

Rueda de Casino

Rueda de Casino In the 1950s Salsa Rueda or more accurately Rueda de Casino was developed in Havana, Cuba.  Pairs of dancers form a circle (“Rueda” in Spanish means “Wheel”), with dance moves called out by one person. Many of the moves involve rapidly swapping partners.  “Rueda de Cuba” is original type of Rueda, originating from Cuba. It is not as formal as Rueda de Miami and consists of about 30 calls. It was codified in the 1970s.

“Rueda de Miami” originated in the 1980s from Miami, is a formal style with many rules based on a mix, and is a hybridization of Rueda de Cuba & Los Angeles-style Salsa and dance routines that reflect American culture (e.g. Coca-cola, Dedo, Adios) which is not found in the traditional Cuban-style Rueda.

Los Angeles style

Salsa (LA Style) L.A. style is danced on 1, in a slot, with a measure of easiness and adaptability to it. It is strongly influenced by the Mambo, Swing, Argentine Tango and Latin Ballroom dancing styles.

L.A. style places strong emphasis on sensuousness, theatricality, aerobics and musicality.

The lifts, stunts and aerial works of today’s salsa shows are derived mostly from L.A. Style forms with origins in Latin Ballroom and Ballet lifts.

The two essential elements of this dance are the forward–backward basic as described above and the cross-body lead. In this pattern, the leader steps forward on 1, steps to the right on 2-3 while turning 90 degrees counter-clockwise (facing to the left), leaving the slot open. The follower then steps straight forward on 5-6 and turns on 7-8, while the leader makes another 90 degrees counter-clockwise and slightly forward, coming back into the slot. After these 8 counts, the leader and follower have exchanged their positions.

Albert Torres, Laura Canellias and Joe Cassini are credited for the early development and growth of L.A. Style Salsa[citation needed]. Later, such dancers as Alex Da Silva, Edie Lewis, Joby Martinez, Josie Neglia, Liz Rojas, Johnny and Francisco Vazquez, and Janette Valenzuela are often credited with developing the L.A. style of Salsa Dancing as we know it today.

New York style

Salsa (New York Style) Like LA-style salsa, New York style is danced in a line. However, unlike LA style, it is danced on the second beat of the music (“on 2″), and the follower steps forward on the first measure of the music, not the leader.

Though he did not create New York style salsa, Eddie Torres is credited with popularizing it, and for having the follower step forward on the first beat.  New York style salsa emphasizes harmony with the percussive instruments in salsa music, such as the congas, timbales, and clave, since many or all of those instruments often mark the second beat in the music.

Salsa Dancing Locations Salsa dances are commonly held in night clubs, ballrooms, restaurants, and outside, especially if part of an outdoor festival. Salsa dancing is an international dance that can be found in most metropolitan cities in the world.

Festivals are held annually, often called a Salsa Congress, in various host cities aimed to attract variety of salsa dancers from other cities and countries. The events bring dancers together to share their passion for the dance, build community, and to share moves and tips with each other. These events usually include salsa dance performers, live salsa music, workshops, open dancing, and contests.

Salsa Dance Short Film

Enjoy an artistic videodance featuring the Salsa dance style.

View more Dance Films on Video Dance TV

Genre Buzz: Dance Parade’s Dance Education Series

Genre Buzz Source: Excerpts from Wikipedia

More about Dance Genre Buzz:

Each month, a new dance style is celebrated. View videos and learn about the heritage and history of different dance styles. Discover innovators of the dance, trends, variations, and current events for each dance genre featured. Watch artistic videodances featuring dance styles, and learn more about Dance made for the Camera.

Participate in Dance Genre Buzz:

Help Dance Parade New York and Video Dance TV support the dance community. Share information on each dance style we feature, including dance classes, events, competitions, and other productions, such as film and video productions. Teachers, participants, and enthusiasts are welcome to share their network and experience with our audience to support dance education, online and on the dance floor!

By, Dawn Paap

Attend Dance Parade’s Social 

January 27th at Dance Manhattan

Join us as Dance Parade celebrates Dance Manhattan as a Float Sponsor in the Sixth Annual Parade!  All are welcomed! Current Dance Manhattan students, feel free to bring your friends, family and colleagues along!

Come meet the organizers of Dance Parade and get to know Dance Manhattan with a FREE introductory dance class @ 8pm, a FREE party starting @ 9:00, and FREE performance showcase @ 10:30.  Followed by a FREE Dance party till 12:30am!

Salsa Party Hosted with Rodney Lopez – Friday January 20th, 2012

Join one of New York City’s long running Salsa Social at Dance Manhattan.  New and experienced dancers alike have enjoyed Dance Manhattan’s monthly Salsa events hosted by Rodney Lopez for more than 10 years.  So come dance On1 or On2 on Dance Manhattan’s large & beautiful dance floor.   Express physically the music you have come to love and make new salsa friends!

Nov
26

Following up our last performances of Samba, Stilts, Bhangra and Bolivian Tinku in front of Alice Tully Hall (65th & Bway) for Winter’s Eve at Lincoln Square, we’ll head over to The David Rubenstein Atrium located on Broadway between 62nd and 63rd for our Dance Parade November Social.

Dance Parade Socials are the perfect times for prospective volunteers to meet the team that makes the parade and festival happen every May as well as produce all of the events and programs that happen all year long to further our mission.

About the Atrium

The David Rubenstein Atrium, a vibrant public visitors’ and ticketing facility on Broadway between 62nd and 63rd Streets is open daily with an array of services for local residents, the general public, and the thousands of people who visit Lincoln Center and the surrounding community every day.

The David Rubenstein Atrium, formerly known as the Harmony Atrium, is one of approximately 503 Privately Owned Public Spaces (POPS) in New York City created under a longstanding program that offers zoning incentives for buildings to provide accessible public spaces. The Harmony Atrium was originally conceived as a lively gathering place for local residents as well as visitors, and The David Rubenstein Atrium proudly fulfills this original vision.

The facility is named in honor of the philanthropist, financier, and Vice Chairman of Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts David Rubenstein, in recognition of his $10 million gift to the Bravo Campaign. The Tod Williams Billie Tsien design reflects a respect for the materials used throughout Lincoln Center and provides an open, accessible, and inviting environment. The Atrium is the first LEED certified, “green” building on the Lincoln Center campus.

The Atrium also features two vertical gardens; a floor-to-ceiling fountain; a media wall with performance information, which also serves as a canvas for video presentations; an art installation by Dutch textile artisan Claudy Jongstra; and 16 “occuli” lighting fixtures that bring natural light and state-of-the-art illumination into the Atrium’s interior.

Nov
23


Every May in New York City, Dance Parade shakes up The Big Apple by providing an outlet for all forms of expression through dance to come together on one single day. The 6th Annual Dance Parade will take place on Saturday, May 19th. The Parade rocks down Broadway from 21st Street, takes a left on St. Mark’s Place and culminates in Tompkins Square Park with DanceFest.

AUDIO DANCE PARADE is a way to keep the beat going all year long featuring DJ mixes from artists all over the world celebrating dance music from all cultures and all music styles! To find out how you can submit please email Chauncey@danceparade.org for more information. We are looking for approximately one hour long mix sessions from house to techno to bhangra to country western to middle eastern and more!

 

This episode of Audio Dance Parade features a fun and funky mix by newcomer with an old school soul DJ Fiischer Priice aka Guy Salazar

click to listen to the newest episode of Audio Dance Parade!

Welcome to The Haus of Priice!

 

Guy Salazar aka Fiischer Priice moved to The Big Apple five years ago to try and “make it big”.   Sidetracked by love, it took him some time to pick himself back up off the ground and find his way to the dance floor.   He went to school,  became a nurse,  got himself a job and now he’s ready to make the NYC nightlife his toy!

 

From a brand new generation of club kids he has emerged to the turntables in 2010.   Inspired by parties thrown by Ladyfag, Tiana Reeves and Amanda Lepore at nightlife castles like APT, Mr. Black and Greenhouse, his musical influences range from Honey Dijon, Michael Magnan, Ron Like Hell, Will Automagic, Ryan Smith to Mike Servito, Kris Wadsworth, Chauncey D and Steve Sidewalk (one of his first friends when he moved to New York from Pennsylvania).   Deep, Classic, Tech, Jack, Acid, Electro and Minimal all live harmoniously beneath the roof of The Haus of Priice and this ‘new Guy on the block’ is just getting started.    In the age of the iPod and ‘celebrity’ DJs,  Mr. Priice brings back the sultry, sweaty and creative era of old school NYC with his beatmatching talents and underground flair.

 

 

click to "like" Fischer Priice on Facebook!

 

Nov
22

April Newman, Production Team

“The excitement in the air, and the joy on the faces of the dancers…”

Dance Parade, Inc. is a volunteer supported non-profit organization! It is the dedication, expertise and rhythm of these brave few that are solely responsible for the success of the event and all the background work that goes on all year long leading up to the parade and festival. Every month, we choose a different volunteer to spotlight.

We ask them a few questions to let you know who they are, where they’ve come from and where they see themselves in the future

How did you first stumble upon Dance Parade?
I re-located to live in NYC three years ago.  I was fascinated by the fact that NYC had so many official parades.  Just like a child I love parades and festivals.  Mid winter I went online to see the dates, and types of parades to be held so that I could set a schedule for my Summer.  I noticed a “Dance Parade” on the agenda.  The more I researched dance parade the more I loved the concept, and…..I decided to become involved as volunteer in 2010 and have loved it ever since!
What is your current role in Dance Parade?

I am a parade group liaison under the “production” coordinator LA Kilpatrick.
Editor’s Note  (LA is having a production meeting Friday December 9th at 6pm, email her at la@danceparade.org if you’d like to join!).

What is your favorite style of dance to watch?  I like the people that dance and twirl the flags before the marching bands.  Perhaps it is called cheerleading.    To participate in?  Personally I love free style dancing to the oldies of rhythm, blues, and soul.

What is your dance background?

I am just a natural born singer/dancer.  Although I have had no formal lesions, I love to sing and dance and I think I am better than average

If you could share the stage with anyone in history famous or not, living or deceased, a trained dancer or not, performing a routine choreographed by yourself…who would it be?

Whoopie Goldberg.  I think she is multi talented, as well as well spoken and funny.  I am sure she can naturally dance.  To see her in a routine would be a riot.

What does the Dance Parade slogan “one parade, many cultures” mean to you?

Dancing is a part of the human psychic.  Every culture has its styles and versions.  Through “Dance Parade” we can all come together and communicate, and share this God given phenomenon.

What dance group are you most looking forward to seeing this year in the parade?

I am looking forward to seeing more African dance groups.  There were only two that I saw this year. For all the peoples of African culture dancing, they are under represented, and their dancing is awesome.

If you could pick a Grand Marshall for this year’s parade….who would it be?

Felix Hernandez.  There is something that must be said for “Grass roots dancing” as well as  “formal” dancing.  The segment of cultural dancing that he represents is documented every 6 weeks at $35.00  a head at Roseland Ballroom.  The place is always packed  with people over 50 years of age that love “dance” and love to dance.

Part of volunteering has a lot to do with strong leadership skills and major teamwork skills….if you were to pick a volunteer of the month…who would you choose?

I especially like DJ, Shireen, and Greg because they make me feel appreciated and welcomed.

If you could pick another country to hold a Dance Parade and Festival….which would it be?

Canada

Volunteering at a non profit organization can at times be daunting and frustrating with limited personnel and limited funding….what is it that keeps you coming back for more and more?

I am retired with a lot of useful skills.  I love to keep busy giving back where I can.  In return I receive.  I am New to New York and I need to make friends.  I can only make friends by being friendly.

Describe your most special memory from Dance Parades past?

The excitement in the air, and the joy on the faces of the dancers and participants as they arrived for the start of the parade.

What salesman pitch would you use to attract a new volunteer into the ‘cult’ that is Dance Parade?

My pitch would be: an  invitation to be a part of the “melting pot culture” of New York City.

To join together with others from different backgrounds and produce a multicultural event.

Thank you so much for asking for my input…it has been a pleasure!

Nov
17

Festive Tinku

Dance Genre Buzz – Tinku Dance

Tinku Dance, an Andean tradition, began as a form of ritualistic combat.  It is native to the northern region of Potosí in Bolivia.  In the language of Quechua, the word “tinku” means encounter.  In the language of Aymara “tinku” means physical attack.

The Tinku is always present in the major festivals and parades of Bolivia. During this ritual, men and women from different communities will meet and begin the festivities by dancing, drinking, and fighting an to honor the Pachamama and to ask for a bountiful harvest.

Tinku Dance - Incallajta New York

Large tinkus are held in Potosí during the first few weeks of May.  In some towns like Macha, the residents celebrate the Festival of the Cross, where the Andean culture takes advantage of this festivity to also maintain the ritual of the Tinku.  The ritual in this region is practiced on a date near the 3rd of May since it coincides with the end of the harvest season. The members of the larger communities (Jatun Ayllus) and the members of the smaller communities (Juchuy Ayllus) congregate annually in the nearest larger town (Jatun Marka) to dance, drink, and fight in the main plaza. In Toro Toro, Potosí, the Tinku tradition remains vigilant. It is celebrated conjointly with the Festival of San Santiago, July 25.

Festive Tinku

The Tinku dance is a representation of an Andean tradition where a battle between two groups is simulated. This Festive Tinku is a dance that carries a warlike rhythm.

Dance

The dance is performed in a crouching stance, bending at the waist. Arms are thrown out and there are various kicks, while the performers move in circles following the beat of the drum. Every jump from one foot to the next is followed by a hard stomp and a thrown fist to signify the violence from the ceremonial tinku. Many times the dancers will hold basic and traditional instruments in their hands that they will use as they stomp, just to add more noise for a greater effect.

Enjoy a look at this dance style by viewing this video.

Because of the rhythmic way the men throw their fists at each other, and because they stand in a crouched stance going in circles around each other, a dance was formed. This dance, the Festive Tinku, simulates the traditional combat, bearing a warlike rhythm.  The differences between the Andean tradition and the dance are the costumes, the role of women, and the fact that the dancers do not actually fight each other. The Festive Tinku has become a cultural dance for all of Bolivia, although it originated in Potosí, like the fight itself.

The Festive Tinku, a much more pleasant experience than a Ceremonial Tinku, has many differences. It has been accepted as a cultural dance in the whole nation of Bolivia. Tinku music has a loud constant drum beat to give it a native warlike feel, while charangos, guitars, and zampoñas (panpipes) play melodies.  The dancers perform with combat like movements, following the heavy beat of the drum.

Ceremonial Tinku

In contrast, the Ceremonial Tinku occurs annually to carry out a real battle between two communities.  The fight begins with personal clashes (“thinkunacuy”) to compare strengths, and to request the fertility of the land. Other group members later join in the fight to perform the encounter of the two clans (“Tinku”).

In the early days, litigations were brought forth over the irrigation water and the use of the land. The communities designated paladins to represent their community. That way only one appointed person’s family would suffer the sorrow in a mortal loss (mourning). The winner obtained the rights demanded for his community.  Just like the modern day tradition of dropping a little chicha (liquor) before drinking from the tutuma (gourd), blood had to be shed in order to fertilize the land.

Ceremonial Tinku

The story behind this cultural dance is that long ago, the Spanish conquistadors made the people be their slaves. By looking in their costumes, you can see the despite the decorations, the clothes are very similar.  Women wear a dress, abarcas, and a hat. Men wear an undershirt, Pants, jacket, abarcas, and hard boney helmet like hats. Even though the people were slaves, they loved to dance, and would often fight, but never really hurt one another.

Couples often meet at Tinkus and marriages are known to result.  The women will form circles and begin chanting while the men proceed to fight each other; sometimes the women will join in the fighting as well.

The fighting, which at times can become very heated, can be a way to confirm or defend collective landholdings and also serves, as a chance for young men to show off in front of women from other communities.  These encounters in modern times are controlled by the authorities to avoid fatalities.

View Ceremonial Tinku battles by watching this video.

Costumes

For Festive Tinku performances, women wear long embroidered long skirts and colorful tops, and wide belt (chumpi).  The female hat has colorful ribbons hanging down the front and decorative feathers on top.

For men, their monteras are usually decorated with long colorful feathers. Tinku Suits, or the outfits men wear in the parades or during Festive Tinku performances, are usually made with bold colors to symbolize power and strength, instead of the neutral colors worn in Ceremonial Tinkus that help participants blend in.  Both men and women wear the traditional abarcas (walking sandals) to cover their feet.

The male Ceremonial Tinku outfit includes a helmet designed to protect the head from lateral blows.  The helmet is adorned with painted feathers. This comes from the influence of other dances such as the Tobas.  The jacketshirt is of bright color. The pants are either black or white with decorations embroidered near the feet. Wide belts and aguayos (native weavings) are tied around the waist and stomach for greater protection from hand strikes.

This dance was brought over to the U.S.A, and now there are many teams such as Incallajta New York, Alma Boliviana, Tinkus Tiataco, Fraternidad Tinkus San Simon, FC Pasion Boliviana, Pachamama, Tinkus Jacha, Los Quechuas, Tinkus Wapurs and many more.

Please join us for Dance Parade’s event this November 28th

See Incallajta New York perform for Winter's Eve

Learn about Bolivian culture and its people.  Dance Parade is delighted to have Incallajta New York showcase Tinkus Dance at the 12th Annual Winter’s Eve at Lincoln Square in New York City!  Click HERE for event details.

Genre Buzz: Dance Parade’s Dance Education Series

Genre Buzz Source: Excerpts from Wikipedia

More about Dance Genre Buzz:

Each month, a new dance style is celebrated. View videos and learn about the heritage and history of different dance styles. Discover innovators of the dance, trends, variations, and current events for each dance genre featured. Watch artistic videodances featuring dance styles, and learn more about Dance made for the Camera.

Participate in Dance Genre Buzz:

Help Dance Parade New York and Video Dance TV support the dance community. Share information on each dance style we feature, including dance classes, events, competitions, and other productions, such as film and video productions. Teachers, participants, and enthusiasts are welcome to share their network and experience with our audience to support dance education, online and on the dance floor!

By, Dawn Paap

View more Dance Films on Video Dance TV

Oct
31

Every May in New York City, Dance Parade shakes up The Big Apple by providing an outlet for all forms of expression through dance to come together on one single day. The 6th Annual Dance Parade will take place on Saturday, May 19th. The Parade rocks down Broadway from 21st Street, takes a left on St. Mark’s Place and culminates in Tompkins Square Park with DanceFest.

AUDIO DANCE PARADE is a way to keep the beat going all year long featuring DJ mixes from artists all over the world celebrating dance music from all cultures and all music styles! To find out how you can submit please email Chauncey@danceparade.org for more information. We are looking for approximately one hour long mix sessions from house to techno to bhangra to country western to middle eastern and more!

This episode of Audio Dance Parade features a dirty and devlish pop infused mix that clocks in just under an hour for your listening pleasure!

 

click to visit Audio Dance Parade on Podomatic!

DJ GUY RUBEN

follow him on twitter

You can dance, for inspiration.

DJ GUY RUBEN has always had music as his inspiration. Growing up there was always music in the house. Everything from B52’s, Madonna, Lips Inc, to The Scorpions! It all started with a Fisher Price record player spinning Cyndi Lauper and the Grease soundtrack and that’s taken him to being a well respected DJ in the San Francisco scene.
Beginning at the impressionable age of 8, he began searching for the hottest 12-inch records, cassingles and recording songs directly off the radio to make mixtapes in his bedroom “studio”. While his collection grew, so did his vast knowledge of music. After years of careful and studious ass-shaking – and perfecting the art of mixtapes – he knew he found his calling: to be a DJ that literally moves people.
Influenced by the likes of Todd Terje, Danny Tenaglia, Riva Starr, DJ Dan, Bad Boy Bill, Treasure Fingers, Donald Glaude, DJ Dimitri from Paris, Hannah Holland, Calvin Harris, Nita Aviance, Armand Van Helden, Eli Escobar, Carl Cox, Basement Jaxx, Freemasons, LA Riots, and Green Velvet. DJ Guy Ruben evokes all their spirits and interweaves DJ sets with his signature red telephone headphone. Mixes that everyone from avid music fans, dancers, club cruisers, even casual listeners can absorb and move to. Specializing in Electronic and House, Guy Ruben’s tastes cross all boundaries. He’s been known to seamlessly infuse his sets with Nu Disco, 80’s and 90’s dance tracks, indie dance, World Beats, Acid House, Italo disco and Parliament-style funk.
Whether it’s a party, a club or a raucous bar environment, he constantly reads the crowds to give them a beat that’s fresh and edgy…and always surprising. He exudes the inspiration that’s moved him since he was a just a tiny tot dancing on the living room rug.

Oct
31

The secret is out!  Dance Parade is proud to announce that it has been chosen to provide additional entertainment for the Annual  Winter’s Eve at Lincoln Square!

The 12th Annual Winter’s Eve at Lincoln Square

On Monday, November 28, 2011 the Lincoln Square Business Improvement District and presenting sponsor Time Warner will host the Twelfth Annual Winter’s Eve at Lincoln Square – New York City’s largest holiday festival! Winter’s Eve kicks off with a neighborhood tree lighting ceremony and features free entertainmentfood tastingsin-store activities and shopping around and about this colorful and vibrant neighborhood.

Dance Parade will provide the following entertainment from 6 to 9pm between 62nd and 65th streets:

  • Incallajta New York (Bolivian Tinkus Dance)
  • Manhattan Samba (Brazilian Samba Band)
  • New York City Stilt Walkers
  • NYC Bhangra (Asian Indian Bhangra Dance)

Stores, restaurants, cultural organizations and public spaces in the district will be buzzing with activities for both children and adults. At the same time, sidewalks along Broadway from Time Warner Center at Columbus Circle to 68th Street will be alive with performers, street musicians, jugglers, stilt-walkers and more, making for a festive fun-filled stroll through the streets of this dynamic Upper West Side neighborhood.

WHEN: Monday, November 28, 2011, 5:30 PM, Rain, Snow or Shine!

WHERE: The celebration begins with a neighborhood tree lighting ceremony at Dante Park at Broadway& 63rd Street and continues along Broadway from Time Warner Center to 68th Street.

BY SUBWAY: Take the 1, A, B, C, or D train to 59th Street/Columbus Circle or the 1 train to 66th Street and Broadway.

FOR MORE INFORMATION: Please go to: http://www.winterseve.org, call 212.581.3774 or email info@lincolnsquarebid.org to learn how to get involved.

click to visit New York Cares website

Admission to Winter’s Eve is free, but consider bringing a gently used or new coat of any size to Broadway and 63rd Street to help keep local children and families warm this winter and support the New York Cares Coat Drive. New York Cares especially needs children’s coats and large men’s coats this season to help those in need citywide.

Oct
14

Dawn Paap, Marketing Team

“Need a way to connect with a community of great artists in NYC?  Start here!  You’ll be amazed by who you meet.” ~ Dawn

Dance Parade, Inc. is a volunteer supported non-profit organization! It is the dedication, expertise and rhythm of these brave few that are solely responsible for the success of the event and all the background work that goes on all year long leading up to the parade and festival. Every month, we choose a different volunteer to spotlight.

We ask them a few questions to let you know who they are, where they’ve come from and where they see themselves in the future.

How did you first stumble upon Dance Parade?

I joined the Dance Police force for the annual Halloween Parade in NYC.  It was a blast handing out citations to the TV reporters and to the NYPD for seemingly impersonating  Dance Police Officers.  They were great sports, and some couldn’t get enough of our antics!  So, it was the best introduction I could have imagined to the Dance Parade team.

What is your current role in Dance Parade?

I’m a Dance Media Editor, Illustrator, and Vlogger.  As part of the marketing team for Dance Parade,  I help develop creative Social Media campaigns, and write the monthly Dance Genre Buzz for Dance Parade’s Dance Education Series.  I’ve also been deemed the ‘Dance Video Queen’ by the staff for my role as Web Producer for Video Dance TV.

What is your favorite style of dance to watch? 

I couldn’t choose one style as my favorite-because I really enjoy all styles of dance.  I consider myself a movement junkie, because I love circus, parkour, freerunning, martial arts, yoga, gymnastics, and anything dance related.
To participate in?
Generally, it’s hip hop, partner dancing, free styling at clubs, or various dance classes when I can afford them.  I’m hooked on yoga and circus right now-trampoline being my favorite-even though its the least practical apparatus to be addicted to!

What is your dance background?

Contemporary hip hop, West African, Argentine Tango, East Coast Swing, Ballroom, and Modern.  I’ve toyed with Breakdancing, Krumping, Aerial Dance, Tumbling, and Fire Spinning.
What can I say?  I enjoy learning new things!

If you could share the stage with anyone in history famous or not, living or deceased, a trained dancer or not, performing a routine
choreographed by yourself…who would it be?

Donald O’Connor -all the way!  I love his comedic flair, and who can forget his solo in “Make ‘Em Laugh” for “Singing in the Rain?” I’d love to be as adorable on stage!

What does the Dance Parade slogan “one parade, many cultures” mean to you?

Dance to me, means unity and community.  Dance Parade offers many artists a unique opportunity to celebrate diversity and share a common love of dance, in all its forms.

What dance group are you most looking forward to seeing this year in the parade?

New groups are always inspiring to see.  I like everything, traditional dance to contemporary. I also enjoy the Aerial Dancers at the DanceFest, because they always rock out some great performances!

If you could pick a Grand Marshall for this year’s parade….who would it be?

Elizabeth Streb.  She’s amazing and one of my absolute favorites.  I’ve enjoyed training at her studio for years.

Part of volunteering has a lot to do with strong leadership skills and major teamwork skills….if you were to pick a volunteer of the
month…who would you choose?

I would choose Chauncey Dandridge, because he’s my partner in Social Media crime!  He’s also a super fantsie DJ, and a great friend.

If you could pick another country to hold a Dance Parade and Festival….which would it be?

I think Japan would be a blast!

Volunteering at a non profit organization can at times be daunting and frustrating with limited personnel and limited funding….what is it that keeps you coming back for more and more?

The common goals of the volunteers and their awesome personalities!  The events are fun too…

Describe your most special memory from Dance Parades past?
My first parade was a blast.  I hung out with friends, soaked in the entire atmosphere & thanked god I lived in NYC where artists are celebrated and appreciated to such a high degree.

What salesman pitch would you use to attract a new volunteer into the cult that is Dance Parade?

Need a way to connect with a community of great artists in NYC?  Start here!  You’ll be amazed by who you meet.

Dawn is also responsible for our monthly Genre Buzz featured in STEPS! the official e-newsletter of Dance Parade New York as well as numerous other innovative and cutting edge marketing strategies that have been extremely crucial to Dance Parade’s success and attention.   You can also check out her Dance Films of the Day and more on her YouTube Page : VIDEODANCETV

Oct
13

Dance Genre Buzz:  Morris Dance

Morris dance is a form of British folk dance usually accompanied by music.  It is based on rhythmic stepping and the execution of choreographed figures by a group of dancers.  Implements such as sticks, swords, handkerchiefs and bells may also be wielded by the dancers.  In a small number of dances for one or two men, steps are performed near and across a pair of clay tobacco pipes laid across each other on the floor.

Claims that English records, dating back to 1448, mention the morris dance are open to dispute.  There is no mention of “morris” dancing earlier than the late 15th century, although early records such as Bishops’ “Visitation Articles” mention sword dancing, guising and other dancing activities as well as mumming plays.

Furthermore, the earliest records invariably mention “Morys” in a court setting, and both men and women are mentioned as dancing, and a little later in the Lord Mayors’ Processions in London. It is only later that it begins to be mentioned as something performed in the parishes. There is certainly no evidence that it is a pre-Christian ritual, as is often claimed.

In the modern day, it is commonly thought of as a mainly English activity, although there are around 150 morris sides (or teams) in the United States. British expatriates form a larger part of the morris tradition in Australia, Canada, New Zealand and Hong Kong.  There are isolated groups in other countries, for example those in Utrecht, Netherlands; the Arctic Morris Group of Helsinki, Finland and Stockholm, Sweden; as well as in Cyprus; and Alsace, France.

David Owen’s video “A Clockwork Morris” showcases the many looks of Morris dance.

Name and origins

The term is derived from moorish dance, attested as Morisk dance and moreys daunce, morisse daunce in the mid-15th century.  The spelling Morris-dance appears in the 17th century. Comparable terms in other languages are German Moriskentanz (also from the 15th century), French morisques, Croatian moreška, and moresco, moresca or morisca in Italy and Spain.

By 1492 Ferdinand of Aragon and Isabella of Castille succeeded in driving the Moors out of Spain and unifying the country.  In celebration of this a pageant known as a Moresca was devised and performed.  This can still be seen performed in places such as Ainsa, Aragon. Incorporated into this pageant was the local dance – the paloteao. This too can still be seen performed in the villages of Aragon, Basque country, Castille, Catalonia and northern Portugal.

The original “Moresca” is believed a sword dance.  The sticks in Morris dance are a residual of the swords in the “Moresca”.  The similarity to what became known as the English “morris” is surmised.  Although the Great London Chronicle records spangled Spanish dancers performing an energetic dance before Henry VII at Christmas of 1494, Heron’s accounts also mention “pleying of the mourice dance” four days earlier which could mean that the Morris Dance was an indigenous entertainment already in existence in England, perhaps from the Middle Ages.  Early court records state that the “moresque” was performed at court in her honour, including the dance – the “moresque” or “morisce” or “morys” dance.

History in England

Before the English Civil War, the working peasantry took part in morris dances, especially at Whitsun.  In 1600 the Shakespearean actor William Kempe morris danced from London to Norwich, an event chronicled in his Nine Daies Wonder (1600).  The Puritan government of Oliver Cromwell, however, suppressed Whitsun Ales and other such festivities.  When the crown was restored by Charles II, the springtime festivals were restored.  In particular, Whitsun Ales came to be celebrated on Whitsunday, as the date coincided with the birthday of Charles II.


Morris dancing continued in popularity until the industrial revolution and its accompanying social changes.  Four teams claim a continuous lineage of tradition within their village or town: Abingdon (their morris team was kept going by the Hemmings Family), Bampton, Headington Quarry, and Chipping Campden.  Other villages have revived their own traditions, and hundreds of other teams across the globe have adopted (and adapted) these traditions, or have created their own styles from the basic building blocks of morris stepping and figures.

Several English folklorists were responsible for recording and reviving the tradition in the early 20th century, often from a bare handful of surviving members of mid-19th-century village sides.  Among these, the most notable are Cecil Sharp, Maud Karpeles, and Mary Neal.

Boxing Day 1899 is widely regarded as the starting point for the morris revival. Cecil Sharp was visiting at a friend’s house in Headington, near Oxford, when the Headington Quarry morris side arrived to perform.  Sharp was intrigued by the music and collected several tunes from the side’s musician, William Kimber; not until about a decade later, however, did he begin collecting the dances, spurred and at first assisted by Mary Neal, a founder of the Espérance Club (a dressmaking co-operative and club for young working women in London), and Herbert MacIlwaine, musical director of the Espérance Club.  Neal was looking for dances for her girls to perform, and so the first revival performance was by young women in London.

In the first few decades of the 20th century, several men’s sides were formed, and in 1934 the Morris Ring was founded by six revival sides.  In the 1960s and especially the 1960s, there was an explosion of new dance teams, some of them women’s or mixed sides.  At the time, there was often heated debate over the propriety and even legitimacy of women dancing the morris, even though there is evidence as far back as the 16th century that there were female morris dancers.  There are now male, female and mixed sides to be found.

Partly because women’s and mixed sides are not eligible for full membership of the Morris Ring, two other national (and international) bodies were formed, the Morris Federation and Open Morris.  All three bodies provide communication, advice, insurance, instructionals (teaching sessions) and social and dancing opportunities to their members.  The three bodies co-operate on some issues, while maintaining their distinct identities.

Styles

Today, there are six predominant styles of morris dancing, and different dances or traditions within each style named after their region of origin.

  • Cotswold Morris - dances from an area mostly in Gloucestershire and Oxfordshire; an established misnomer, since the Cotswolds overlap this region only partially. Normally danced with handkerchiefs or sticks to accompany the hand movements.
  • North West Morris - more military in style and often processional.
  • Border Morris - from the English-Welsh border: a simpler, looser, more vigorous style, normally danced with blackened faces (or sometimes otherwise coloured, given the negative connotations for some of blackface).
  • Longsword dancing  - from Yorkshire and south Durham.
  • Rapper -  or Short sword dancing from Northumberland and Co. Durham.
  • Molly Dancing -  from the English Midlands and East Anglia.

This video is a Rapper Sword Dancing performance by Toronto’s Women’s Sword group, a film by the University of Toronto Celtic Society. 

Modern dance

The “soul” of morris dancing exists within many individual groups, which are for the most part constituted as autonomous clubs or sides, each with its own constitution and procedures.  Sides do not exist in isolation, and generally co-exist in a spirit of good-will and meet regularly, not just at large Folk Festivals or meetings organized by the three national umbrella organizations (Ring, Federation and Open), but also at annual Feasts or Ales that many sides organize.  Apart from copious amounts of drinking and eating, these events (which can run over a whole weekend) are an opportunity for large numbers of morris dancers and musicians from across the country to come together in massed ensembles, performing throughout the area covered by the host side.

In theory, sides may acknowledge geographic rights of others, although, except in very unusual cases, there is actually nothing to stop one side performing in the heartland of another.  In the past this may have rarely been done without permission and agreement, but in modern practice such courtesies are mainly taken for granted. In most cases, sides partner each other via a system of mutual invitations at Morris Dancing venues.

Morris dancing is now an art and recreation enjoyed by men and women across the world.  In England, there are many Mixed Morris sides that enable people to dance and have roles irrespective of gender.

Evolution

The continuance of the morris is as much in the hands of independent groups of enthusiasts as it is in the nationwide groupings such as The Morris Ring or The Morris Federation.  So while for some sides there is a feeling that the music and dance recorded in the 19th century should be maintained, there are others who freely reinterpret the music and dance to suit their abilities and including modern influences.

In 2008 a front page article in the Independent Magazine noted the rising influence of neopaganism within the modern morris tradition.  The article featured the views of neopagan sides Wolf’s Head and Vixen Morris and Hunter’s Moon Morris and contrasted them with those of the more traditional Long Man Morris Men.

Conversely, the Telegraph carried a report on 5 January 2009, predicting the demise of morris dancing within 20 years, due to the lack of young people willing to take part.  This widespread story originated from a senior member of the more traditionally-minded Morris Ring, and may only reflect the situation in relation to member groups of that one organization.

In 2008 a front page article in the Independent Magazine noted the rising influence of neopaganism within the modern morris tradition.  The article featured the views of neopagan sides Wolf’s Head and Vixen Morris and Hunter’s Moon Morris and contrasted them with those of the more traditional Long Man Morris Men.

Conversely, the Telegraph carried a report on 5 January 2009, predicting the demise of morris dancing within 20 years, due to the lack of young people willing to take part.  This widespread story originated from a senior member of the more traditionally-minded Morris Ring, and may only reflect the situation in relation to member groups of that one organization.

The following video is a fun comedy about a teenage gang’s tribute to Morris dancing and Professor John.  Enjoy!  

The advent of the internet in the 1990s has also given morris sides a new platform upon which to perform.  Many morris sides now have entertaining websites which seek to reflect the public persona of the individual sides as much as record their exploits and list forthcoming performances.

There are also a multitude of thriving Morris related blogs, forums and individual sides are to be found maintaining an interactive presence on major social networking sites.  In addition, there are a variety of dance videos online, feature films and documentaries on Morris dance.

Morris Dance Feature Film:

Watch the trailer to the film “Morris: A Life with Bells On” showcasing the choreography of Roger Chapman

To view this film online, go to http://www.azmovielist.net/movies/morris_a_life_with_bells_on_2010/ 

Genre Buzz Source: Excerpts from Wikipedia

More about Dance Genre Buzz:

Each month, a new dance style is celebrated. View videos and learn about the heritage and history of different dance styles. Discover innovators of the dance, trends, variations, and current events for each dance genre featured. Watch artistic videodances featuring dance styles, and learn more about Dance made for the Camera.

Participate in Dance Genre Buzz:

Help Dance Parade New York and Video Dance TV support the dance community. Share information on each dance style we feature, including dance classes, events, competitions, and other productions, such as film and video productions. Teachers, participants, and enthusiasts are welcome to share their network and experience with our audience to support dance education, online and on the dance floor!

By, Dawn Paap

View more Dance Films on Video Dance TV

Oct
10

20111008-002139.jpg

FLOW AFFAIR Flag-Dancing Documentary Film

Wednesday, October 12, 2011

7:00 PM-9:00 PM (doors open 6:30 PM)
St. John’s Lutheran Church, 81 Christopher Street (between 7th Avenue South and Bleecker Street), NYC

FREE admission, open to the public

Followed by Question-and-Answer session with the

film’s director Wolfgang Busch

FLOW AFFAIR probes gay art form’s community history, heralds new, mainstream dance, fitness & therapy revolution, encourages HIV education & includes Melba Moore, Ms. Morgan & other stars on soundtrack; movie being shown at “church” screenings nationwide.

NEW YORK– Over 20 years after the “vogue”-dancing and drag-ball culture, documentary film Paris Is Burning was released, Art from the Heart Films announces the Manhattan premiere screening of its motion picture FLOW AFFAIR: FAN, FLAG, POI, FLOGUING, DANCE  www.flowaffair.org

View the Film Trailer for FLOW AFFAIR below.

The movie probes community history and personalities as well as the hand-held, flag- and fan-swirling and -twirling flow art that has dance-floor roots among Lesbian-Gay-Bisexual-Transgender-Queer (LGBTQ) club-goers and individuals.

As flagging and fanning are also catching fire with non-LGBTQ enthusiasts, FLOW AFFAIR in addition heralds a novel, mainstream dance, fitness and therapy revolution: Floguing is the new vogue-dancing with flags; and the art form’s spinning and twisting motions have been called a great shoulder and cardio workout (www.goldsgym.com/gyms/class/12702 ) and praised for their visually meditative benefits. What’s more, Art from the Heart intends for the film to inspire viewers to seek optimal HIV education (AIDS almost wiped out the flagging community during the 1980s).

Singers Melba Moore and Ms. Morgan and “electronic-music godfather” Man Parrish, among others, add their star power to the soundtrack for FLOW AFFAIR. Concerning the film itself, Art for the Heart initially premiered the movie in San Francisco and plans to screen it in churches from Chicago to Dallas, Boston and Miami.

In addition, 1980s and -90s, chart-topping, rhythm-and-blues singer and Queens native Meli’sa Morgan will address the audience at this event, which is part of St. John’s Church’s activities calendar. http://stjohnslutheranonline.org/home/  for “Coming Out Week”
(“Coming Out Day” is observed internationally every October 11th or 12th)

Get Your Flag On
“What voguing was for Madonna, floguing can be for perhaps Lady Gaga–or really any one,” says director/producer Wolfgang Busch, a grass-roots organizer who brought the flagging and voguing communities together in 2006 and in FLOW AFFAIR is now introducing the new dance, floguing. Flagging + Voguing = Floguing.

Floguing has been featured in Mariah Carey’s music-video ‘Loverboy’

Floguing is creative fun for kids

Floguing is a therapy aid for special-needs folks

Evolution of Dance
FLOW AFFAIR explores the evolution of dance by showcasing the emergence of flagging–which has only begun to show up at underground circuit parties and dance clubs, and in innovative dance choreography. Performing in FLOW AFFAIR are:

  • Xavier Caylor from San Francisco is one of the most influential tie-dye Flag-Maker and teacher in the United States and beyond. Caylor is planting seeds wherever he goes with the hopes to create new tribes, to keep this legacy alive.
  • Mykel a New York City-based recording artist and theatrical performer is incorporating flags and fans into his musical performances.
  • Jeannette Torres, mother of 13 year old Ryche, reveals why they call his mom the angry lesbian.
  • Nelia is a regular circuit club flagger and her mission is to teach more women how to flag.
  • Bert Seva, a fanner from the 80’s, he started out as a flagger but he always got tangled with the flags so he switched to fans.
  • Other featured dancers are: Mark Stewart, Felipe Grandinetti from Brazil, Aaton Enigma, Art By Davey, Mike Rahn, George Jagatic, Brad Carpenter, Flaggerboy, Victor Mauro, David Gosbin, Dean Vitale, Ryan Wilcox, Kevin Omni, Poi dancer GlitterGirl, The Colors of the Wind, and the voguing dance legend Javier Ninja.

Who Is Your “Flag Daddy?”
In the underground flagging and fanning dance communities, the person who shows you how to flag or fan for the first time in a dance club, or who gives you the first set of flags or fans, is called your Flag- or Fan Daddy.

About Your Flag Daddy
Wolfgang Busch, a community-organizer and activist, is an openly gay documentarian. His first feature documentary release, How Do I Look (2006), was about the success of the Harlem House Ball/Drag Ball community in creating cutting-edge trends in fashion, dance, and runway. He uses the arts to empower communities all over the United States.

Musical Recording Stars and the Soundtrack
The documentary features musical recordings by:

  • Melba Moore is the ground-breaking Tony Award-winning actress and singer. She has collaborated musically with Michael Jackson and has starred on Broadway opposite Eartha Kitt. Moore was a member of the original cast of the musical Hair, along with Diane Keaton. When Moore replaced Keaton in the role of Sheila, Moore became the first black actor to replace a white actor in a leading role on Broadway. Moore contributed the dance single Been There, Done That and the power-ballad The Other Side Of The Rainbow to the FLOW AFFAIR soundtrack.
  • Meli’sa Morgan was accepted and attended Julliard School of the Performing Arts and also attended the famed Lee Strasberg acting school. In 1994, she topped Billboard magazine’s Hot Dance Club Play chart. Morgan contributed the R&B single All In The Name Of Love to the soundtrack.
  • Jerico of the Angles is a well-known vocal recording artist, a Grammy- nominated songwriter, stage and screen actor and performance art rocker. He contributed the title song for the soundtrack. With the FLOW AFFAIR track, Jerico adds to his impressive body of recorded work that spans three decades.
  • The legendary New York DJ and night club historian Man Parrish composed the hot bitch track, Floguing … Is Like Voguing.

Are You Flowing?
To see where FLOW AFFAIR will go next, for screening with lecture bookings, distribution inquiries, and where you can purchase the DVD and CD soundtrack, we invite you to visit:
http://www.flowaffair.org/ and http://www.ArtFromTheHeartnyc.org

By Dawn Paap

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 25 other followers

%d bloggers like this: